1830 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

William Jerdan

T. A., "Rejected Epigrams: offered to, but not accepted by, the Editor of a Weekly Publication" The Examiner (15 August 1830) 522.



1.
QUESTION.
What is the meaning, pray, of "heavy wet?"
ANSWER.
Why, J—, and his Literary Gazette.

2.
Our forefathers bestow'd the name of "lurdan"*
On despicable things. We now say "jerdan."

3.
In lanes, and at the corners of the streets,
The eye of passengers a caution greets,
Advising them that at that sacred spot
The laws of decency be not forgot,
In terms so plain, the most unletter'd lurdan
Can scarce mistake — save Literary J—n,
Who thinks he hits the meaning, and the true sense,
While in his writings he "commits no new sense."

4.
If we believe St. Paul, and Scripture sense,
There are, and must be, "Vessels of offence:"
That casts its water upon blameless men,
Replenish'd to the brim with stalest ware,
Yet, strange to tell, a favorite with the fair;
And for perversion, with an eye to pelf,
Makes of good things a handle for itself.

* Lurdan, or lurdane — originally Lord Dane — applied by our Saxon progenitors to their Danish oppressors, naturally falling afterwards into a name of contempt. We insert this explanation for the information of Mr. —.