1756 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. John Dyer

John Duncombe, "Horace, Ode Bk. I No. 26 imitated. To the Rev. Mr. Dyer" 1756; Works of Horace, ed. Duncombe (1757) 1:93.



Let Fortune and the Muse be kind,
And smile upon my Strain,
I give my Sorrows to the Wind,
Or bid old Medway bear them to the Main.

Let Armies march, or Squadrons fail,
No Gallic Threats I fear,
Let me but range this flowery Vale,
And catch the Lowing of that distant Steer.

Or thro' yon Meadow let me stray,
With new-shorn Fleeces white,
And meditate the rural Lay
Of him, who sung on Grongar's woodland Height.

Round him Rome's Genius, rouz'd from Sleep,
Has bid that Ivy bloom,
Which decks some Temple's mouldring Heap,
Or clings with clasping Arms to Virgil's Tomb.

Those Honours which to Greece's Bard
Were once by Plato shown,
Shall Britain give, and soon reward,
Her Poet's Labours with a woolen Crown.