1859 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Thomas Randolph

David Masson, in Life of John Milton (1859-94; 1965) 1:138-39.



These three taverns — the Dolphin kept by Hamon, the Rose by Wolfe, and the Mitre by Farlow — were the favourite taverns of Cambridge; "the best tutors," as the fast students said, "in the university." When the Mitre fell down in 1634, Randolph, then a Fellow of Trinity College, gave this receipt to the landlord for re-edifying it:—

Then drink sack, Sam, and cheer thy heart;
Be not dismayed at all;
For we will drink it up again,
Though we do catch a fall.
We'll be thy workmen day and night,
In spite of bug-bear proctors:
Before, we drank like freshmen all;
But now we'll drink like Doctors.