1790 ca. ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

William Jackson of Exeter

George Hardinge, "To William Jackson, of Exeter" 1790 ca.; Hardinge, Miscellaneous Works (1818) 2:13.



Jackson! whose Melodies — to Fancy's ear
Sweet prompters of the love-impassion'd Muse—
Her melting strains with eloquence infuse
That Verse despairs to reach! — The hope — the fear
Of amorous youth — and Beauty's glowing tear—
Assenting blushes, when the lips refuse—
The lov'd who fly — the Lover that pursues—
Confess thee — Minstrel of the heart; sincere
In homage to the lyre, whose fairy note
With art conceal'd, for ev'ry shade of thought
Breathes an appropriate sound! Thy numbers tell
A softer tale than musing Shenstone wrote,—
Or Emma's younger Bard* enamour'd caught
From the wild sweetness of a ruder shell.

* "The Nut Browne Maide," which Prior has improved. Jackson has beautifully set a part of it.