1825 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

David Parkes

John F. M. Dovaston, "To Mr. D. Parkes" Poems (1825) 327.



Right sooth the Painter's and the Poet's skill
From the same source in kindred currents flows;
And as the heart-springs pulse it on the will,
Just so the Canvas or the Canto shows.
Thus comes it, PARKES, that on the soft repose
(Soft as thy tints) of Shenstone's landscape line,
Lull'd in delight thy fancy loves to gloze,
And thy chaste pencil with his pen combine.
He was my father's friend, as thou art mine,
Nor slighted he the mute admiring thought
Awak'd in others by his Art divine,
And hail'd him friend that but the feeling caught,
If then the Muses' sons do not disdain
Who feel what they perform — I'm of your train.