1812 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Charles Hoyle

Charles Caleb Colton, in Hypocrisy, a Satire (1812) 7 &n.



Such Authors to fine writing make pretence,
Yet spurn that rare endowment, common sense;
These Milton's measure not his style command,
And filch that Master's harp, but not his hand;
Through tomes of epic lumber, labour hard,
Resembling but in blindness Sinai's bard;
Now Southey's Madoc quits the groaning stall,
To visit at the Grocer's, Sotheby's Saul;
Now o'er this deluged land Exodiads bring
A greater plague than all the plagues they sing;
Wherein poor Pharaoh deems it sad to sink
With Hoyle,* drowned o'er again in seas of Ink.
High thoughts from heaven derive illustrious birth!
Words are the fickle "daughters of the Earth."

* Mr. H. must not expect to pass current as an Epic Poet on the mere credit of having written so many thousand lines of blank verse, until he can persuade mankind to shut their eyes.