1651 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Samuel Sheppard

George Rosse, "To the Author on his exquisite Epigrams and other Poems" Sheppard, Epigrams (1651) sig. B-Bv.



Thus Anacreon taught of yore,
Thus the quaint Venusian chanted,
Songs that made Scilla cease to rore,
And the rage of Tyrants daunted:
Thus Thracian Orpheus strook his strings,
Listned to by Founts, and springs.

Thus witty Martial did compile,
Ausonius thus quaff't Helicon,
And here in this our Borean Isle,
Thus once warbled Harrington:
Though thou exceed'st his strain as farr,
As Cynthia doth the smallest Starr.

Thus learned Maro sang of old,
(Underneath the broad Beech-tree)
Songs fit for to be grav'd in gold,
He was but a type of thee:
Thus Theocritus, and Browne,
Made the Dryades their owne.

(Deare Sir) the very soule of wit
In this body of your book
Resides, (and takes delight in it)
May that man be thunder-strook,
That (by hellish Instigation)
Shall project a separation.