1740 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Thomas Tickell

Catherine Jemmat, "Inscription on the Monument of Thomas Tickel, Esq." 1740; Miscellanies in Prose and Verse (1766) 172.



Read Tickel's name, and gently tread the clay,
Where lie his sole remains that could decay:
Then pensive sigh, and thro' fair science trace
His mind, adorn'd with every pleasing grace;
Worth such as Rome would have confess'd her own,
Wit such as Athens would have proudly shewn.
Substance to thought, and weight to fancy join'd,
A judgment perfect, and a taste refin'd;
Admir'd by Gay, by Addison belov'd,
Esteem'd by Swift, by Pope himself approv'd.
His spirit, rais'd by that sublime he knew
Hence to the seat of bright perfection flew,
Leaving to sorrowful Clotilda here,
A mourning heart, and ever-flowing tear.