1752 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

John Dryden

Horatio, "On seeing Mr. Dryden's Bust, with nothing but his Name, in Westminster Abbey" Gentleman's Magazine 22 (May 1752) 234.



Reader! with awe approach this sacred bust,
Revere the shrine, and hail the hallow'd dust;
Ye muses, all the sweets of fancy bring,
The summer's full-blown pride, and bloom of spring;
Come crown'd with garlands from your roseate bowers,
And this sad shrine perfume with choicest flowers;
Or hear him fancy from the dread abode,
Glow in each line, and thunder with the God.
Thy name, O Dryden! by the muse belov'd,
By all admir'd, by all mankind approv'd!
Shall shoot and flourish in perennial day,
'Till time grows old, and memory waste away.
Tho' dumb the bust, yet future bards shall tell,
None ever soar'd so high, or more lamented fell.