1755 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Thomas Blacklock

Anonymous, in "Verses written by a very near sighted Gentleman" Scots Magazine 17 (January 1755) 44.



Yet, yet, illustrious youth, no more repine
That HOMER'S, or that MILTON'S lot is thine;
Since from those tuneful bards the palm you bear,
And more our wonder claim, as more their fate you share.
If, where the body's light extinct we find,
Such inward rays illuminate the mind,
Who would not wish to be for ever blind?

Ev'n he whose pious muse attempts to raise
This humble verse to thy immortal praise,
Partakes thy loss: with close, contracted sight
All things he views, and scarce discerns aright
Those objects which, in mid-day lustre shine,
The sun's bright orb, or female face divine.
Yet, might an equal portion of thy fire
With notes like thine his swelling breast inspire,
His soul with heav'nly visions blest would glow,
And leave to seeing mortals all below.
Bath.