1773 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Lord Chesterfield

Philagathos, "On the Death of Lord Chesterfield" London Chronicle (6 April 1773) 321.



Alas! is STANHOPE dead! Apollo cry'd;
Then gone, Britannia, 's all thy boasted pride:
The pointed epigram, satiric stroke,
The mirthful sally, and the well-tim'd joke,
Just principles in manly sense array'd,
And truth by hum'rous arguments convey'd;
All sleep in STANHOPE: he the last of those
In Liberty's fair cause who greatly rose;
Drove fell Corruption from behind the throne,
And in their country's honour fix'd their own.

No, God of Wit, Britannia's griev'd replies:
BATHURST still lives, tho' old; and till he dies
In vain shall Dullness hope imperial sway,
Tho' Whitehead chants on ev'ry natal day.
In vain shall Infidels, with artful wile,
Scatter their poison o'er my fav'rite isle:
Resolv'd and steady, see Oxonia stands
To guard my truths from sacrilegious hands.