1802 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Robert Burns

James Pace, "The the Memory of Burns" Scots Magazine 64 (July 1802) 594.



The highest bliss to deepest sorrow turns,
When that which caused the joy is torn away;
So 'tis with thee, alas! lamented Burns,
Too early fallen to moulder in the clay;
But tho' thy mortal part may feel decay,
Yet still shall live and last, thy laurell'd fame;
Thy song, to future ages, shall display
The blaze of genius, all thy praise proclaim,
And 'mid immortal bards enrol thy deathless name.

On strongest wing 'twas thine on high to soar,
To paint wild fancy's scenes with choicest art,
Or, penetrating deeply, explore,
Each secret working of the human heart;
Well could thy muse her thrilling power exert,
To touch the softer feelings of the mind;
And sprightly mirth and purest joys impart;
With heavenly frienship and benevolence kind.—
Ah! thou hast gone for aye, nor left thy peer behind.