1774 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Lord Chesterfield

Lucinda, "On seeing a Portrait of the late Earl of Chesterfield" Westminster Magazine 2 (July 1774) 375.



The mind of STANHOPE, like his face,
Was well adorn'd with every grace;
No affectation in his mien,
Cheerful his aspect, yet serene:
But look within — in fairer lines,
A bright, a lively genius shines.
This world he view'd — he view'd it well,
And all its stratagems could tell;
Well he observ'd the ways of men;
He mark'd their actions with his pen:
Now in his LETTERS you may find
The only transcript of his mind;
Which is adapted to engage,
Instruct, and bless the rising age.
This will secure them, lest they stray,
And lead them to the prudent way.
Observe his cautions to his son;
Who in the path of duty run;
Early inform'd him of each snare,
And bid him "fly the guilty Fair."
Nay, all the female sex he thought
Was giddy, trifling, good for nought:
This, Ladies! was a fault, we know;
He was Man's friend, but Woman's foe.