1775 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Robert Colvill

A Lady, "The Chaplet, to the Reverend and Ingenious Mr. Colvill" Weekly Magazine or Edinburgh Amusement 29 (29 July 1775) 113-14.



Sweet Bard! whose chaste impassion'd song
Steals on the soul, where smoothly glide,
Wand'ring her fertile isles among,
The streams of Fortha's silver tide.

This chaplet from the tuneful hill
I cull'd for thee one careful morn,
When Maia, bath'd in sorrow's well,
Fresh flow'rets wak'd thee to adorn.

Let the gaudy, sportive Muses,
With ideal sorrows flow;
Better he who artless chuses
Melting strains of real woe.

He, with sadly pleasing anguish,
FALLING GREATNESS shall deplore;
Aid the friendless, doom'd to languish—
Wipe the rain from ev'ry flow'r.

He from fairest truth shall borrow
Strains which sacred grief impart;
He unlock the springs of sorrow
That bedew the feeling heart.

Pensive o'er his mournful dittay,
Him the list'ning virgin throng,
Shedding angel tears of pity,
Oft shall hear the woods among.

From the smiles of fortune turning,
From the blaze of pow'r and pride,
Virtue's injur'd shrine adorning,
Fame with thee shall still abide.

Round thy brow fresh flow'rets wreathing,
She transmit the Poet's name;
In her hallow'd page bequeathing
His best meed, immortal fame.
St. James's Place, June 1775.

See Mr. Colvill's Poems to the countess of Sutherland, gen. de Paoli, to Sir Robert Murray Keith, and the Albion Princess, lately published.