1798 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

John Milton

A. M., "Verses to Milton" Edinburgh Magazine or Literary Miscellany NS 12 (October 1798) 300.



Happy bard! thy name shall live
While the wheeling ages turn;
While the sun's bright coursers drive,
Glorious through the gates of morn.

While the moon's cold virgin ray
Dyes in pale the starry host;
And the moments melt away,
Never shall thy name be lost;

Never shall oblivion's rest
Dim with years thy mighty shade,
Gath'ring like the rolling mist,
On giant Pentland's hoary head.

Round thine altars, laurel-crown'd,
Britain's shame and Britain's boast,
Shall the swelling hymn resound
To thine ill-requited ghost.

There the Spring her purest dews
Heav'n-distill'd, shall balmy pour;
And each bright celestial Muse,
Amarinth's ambrosial show'r.

There shall Fancy's infant choir
On their painted pinions roam;
With Eolian airy lyre
Bid thy mighty Spirit come.

Never shall oblivion's rest
Mantle round thine hallow'd shade,
Gath'ring round thine hallow'd shade,
Thick on Pentland's hoary head.
Edinburgh.