1801 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Anne Grant

Mr. Molleson, "On Mrs. Grant of Laggan's Manuscript Poems" Edinburgh Magazine or Literary Miscellany NS 17 (February 1801) 228-29.



Soft sounds the dulcet lyre of Laggan's muse,
Warbling of Nature's beauties from her cot;
Who can poetic garlands e'er refuse,
To such a sweetly-breathing note?

Expands thy soul, at rural scenes sublime?
At Mountains blue, and wildly gushing streams?
Or mansions, mould'ring by the lapse of time,
Illumin'd by the sun's departing beams?

Here sounds a string accordant to the theme;
And here, another sounds to social joy—
To humour, glancing like a flashing beam—
To scenes domestic, that can never cloy.

Thus Cona's voice would sing of nature wild,
Of blasted heaths, and ocean's sullen roar;
Then tune his varying harp to virtues mild,
To love and pity — when the wars were o'er.

Lov'st thou a draught from Heliconian spring?
To woo the muse, Illisus vale along?
Here flow some rills that classic sweetness bring,
Here Tempe's vale looks ever "green in song."

Hast thou a heart attun'd to friendship's lays?
A heart that grateful swells, when friends are kind?
Then gladly hear the note of pleasing praise,
And let it charm thy ear and raptur'd mind.

Blest Boreas! repress your piercing pow'rs!
Touch not the tuneful songstress' hallow'd roof!
And Macedonian like, 'mid Theban tow'rs,
From genius' dwelling keep your bands aloof!

Warm be th' abode of northern Laggan's muse!
Peace be to her who sings so sweet a lay!
Let social joy, and all a mother's dues,
Cheer and enlighten her domestic day!