1756 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Horace Walpole

William Pulteney, "On Mr. Walpole's House at Twickenham" Gentleman's Magazine 26 (April 1756) 192.



Some talk of Gunnisbury,
For Sion some declare,
And some say that with Chiswick-house
No villa can compare.
But all the beaux of Middlesex,
Who know the country well,
Say Strawberry-hill, that Strawberry-hill,
Doth bear away the bell.

Tho' Surry boasts its oatlands,
And Clairmont, kept so gim;
And tho' they talk of Southcots,
'Tis but a dainty whim.
For ask the gallant Bristow,
Who doth in taste excell,
If Strawberry-hill, if Strawberry-hill,
Don't bear away the bell.

Since Denham sung of Cowpers,
There's scarce a hill around,
But what in song or ditty,
Is compar'd to fairy ground.
Oh peace be with their memories,
I wish them wond'rous well;
Yet Strawberry-hill, yet Strawberry-hill,
Must bear away the bell.

Some like to roll down Greenwich
For this thing, and for that,
And some prefer sweet Marble-hill,
Tho' sure 'tis wond'rous flat,
Yet Marble-hill or Greenwich,
As Kitty Clive can tell,
From Strawberry-hill, from Strawberry-hill,
Can never bear the bell.

Great William dwells at Windsor,
As Edward did of old,
And many a Gaul, and many a Scot,
Have felt he is as bold.
On lofty hills, like Windsor,
Such heroes ought to dwell,
But little folks like Strawberry,
Like Strawberry-hill as well.