1789 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

John Williams

W. Whitby, "To Anthony Pasquin, Esq." Poems by Anthony Pasquin (1789) 1:xxi.



For thee, O PASQUIN! whose satiric strain,
(Replete with attic salt, and just disdain,)
Strikes shame and terror to the guilty heart,
And, daring Folly, wounds in ev'ry part:
For thee the virgins of the choir divine,
Th' immortal goddesses, the sacred nine,
From Helicon's embow'ring heights repair,
To bless thy labours, and attend thy pray'r;
To thee, the scourge of Folly they entrust,
As Juvenal severe, as Persius just.
Astraeas friends, with joy, thy justice own,
While Vice is tott'ring on her brilliant throne;
The sons of Dulness sink beneath thy force,
And Arrogance eludes thy dreadful course!
Still more admir'd than CHURCHILL shalt thou be,
A brighter fire than CHURCHILL'S glows in thee!
Proceed, great bard, all meaner things disdain,
And give a loose to thy satiric vein;
Lash Error, Folly, Vice, reform the Stage,
And blaze the Flaccus of the present age.
Cambridge, Feb. 10, 1789.