1774 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Sir Joseph Mawbey

Anonymous, in A Bagatelle. A Dialogue (1774) 13 &n.



Zounds! has thine idle rhapsody no end?
To what does all this declamation tend?
Think'st thou thy Muse, by such tame harmless strains,
Will shame Sir Joseph back to hogs and grains?
That Wilkes for these will one bold lye suppress,
Or rancorous Kenrick forge a line the less?...

Mawbey. — This wight flashed into the political hemisphere, out of the Mash-tub, a most disinterested Patriot, and profound Politician; nor has his attention to the Public Welfare so wholly engrossed his time, but that he has found leisure to let the Muses understand he was not insensible to their charms: he composed some very pretty pieces; but Time has not left one of them to favor my readers with a quotation from. He was ambitious too of appearing as a man of nice honor; but — a plague on that Wyat!