1726 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Laurence Eusden

William Pattison to Laurence Eusden, 22 December 1726, in Memoir of William Pattison, Pattison, Works (1728) 38.



Dear Mr. Eusden,

I have been warmly sollicited to return to College by the next Term, but I cannot immediately give you my Resolution, I beg your Advice upon the Matter, and shall, with a great deal of Pleasure, consider any Thought you shall think proper to offer, because I know your Affection will design them to my Advantage. I suppose, by this Time, you have seen my Proposals, and, I hope, encouraged them with your Hand; if you can oblige me with your Interest in Cambridge, or Recommendations here in Town, I know you will give me leave to depend upon them. I begin now to meet with better Success then I could ever promise my self, as a Stranger. I was, Yesterday, agreeably surprized with a Subscription and Compliment upon my Understanding, from a certain stanch old Critick, whom I leave you to guess at; you will excuse me from the Vanity of transcribing the Verses, and be satisfied with them in the Place they are intended for. In Mr. Savage's Miscellany, there are several things by Aaron Hill, Esq; and, I think, very peculiar to his Character. I learnt Yesterday, that the Battle of the Poets was wrote by Mr. Cooke, who is translating Hesiod by Subscription. There's a very arch Bob, wrote upon Dr. Young and Mr. Philips, by Mr. Moore, Author of a new Play, now in Rehearsal at the Old House; but as it is only handed about in Manuscript, I have not an Opportunity of sending it. Pray commend me to your good Family, and believe me to be

Yours most affectionately,

W. PATTISON.

Old-Man's, December

the 22d. 1726.