1787 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Ann Yearsley

Fidelia, "Addressed to Mrs. Yearsley, Poetess of Bristol" New Lady's Magazine 2 (February 1787) 103.



Yes, Anna, I confess it, thou hast caught,
And still shalt hold, in ever during ties,
Fidelia's growing love. For pow'r like thine,
More than the magnet can prevail to draw,
And fix the wond'ring and admiring throng.
Attraction infinite! yet none of all,
Who own thy influencing, magic sway,
Who view, with rapture, thy bright native charms,
Beam forth refulgent, from thy treasur'd soul,
None sure, than me, more ardent wishes know,
To realize the bliss, thy pen pourtrays,
With energy divine. Thinkest thou, aught
Could more delight Fidelia, than to prove,
In pleasing bondage, that transcending joy,
Which in the chains of friendship center'd lies?
Ah! no, believe it not, with thee to join,
In the firm bonds of interchanging love,
Would be the sov'reign happiness of her,
Who boast no other claim to thy regard,
Than that, created by the hand of heaven,
When forming souls alike congenial;
As such, may heaven record my promis'd faith,
And ratify the future vows we make
Of unimpairing love.