1789 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

William Hamilton Reid

J. F—s, "On reading the Poetical Productions of W. Hamilton Reid" New Lady's Magazine 4 (October 1789) 548.



Hail, tuneful bard, whose wood-wild notes inspire
With Ovid's sweetness, and with Pindar's fire;
By nature — not by imitation taught
Whose fancy decks, whose truth sustains each thought:
The flowery meads, the groves, the moss-grown cells,
Where fancy roves, where heav'nly musing dwells;
The nymphs and fawns, and all the sportive throng,
Revere thy lyre, and hail thy sweeter song;
E'en Sylphs and Fays oft quit their mystic rounds
In sylvan shades, to drink thy magic sounds:
Naiads for thee might quit sweet Avon's stream,
And leave awhile their darling Shakespeare's theme,
Since Comus here unites th' unusual strains,
Where attic wit and native humour reigns.
But I in vain attempt the poet's praise,
None but Apollo could bestow the bays.
Essex-Street.