1812 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

John F. M. Dovaston

R. Rylance, "To my Friend Dovaston, on his Metrical Romance of Fitz-Gwarine" 1812; Dovaston, Poems (1825) ii.



CAMBRIA, thy harp too long untouch'd hath been,
Save by the mountain-wind's far-roving wing
That waves the fern on BREIDDEN, light and green,
It's sweetest notes swelling on each trembling string.
But DOVASTON has borne it from the wild,
To ring in halls where GWARINE'S sons abide,
Their daughters smil'd to hear his preludes tried,
And hail'd him early Fancy's wayward child.
A bolder note he strikes; the CHIEF attends,
Uprise the tow'rs of WHITTINGTON spell-wrought,
While o'er his harp the lovely CLARICE bends,
And tempers mildly sweet each glowing thought.
Listen his lays, for, while they vibrate clear,
Past age's clouds roll off, and distant times appear.
London, November 1812.