1797 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Anna Seward

David Samwell, "To Miss Seward, on her Runic Poem, Herva at the Tomb of Argantyr" 1797; Poetical Register and Repository of Fugitive Poetry for 1805 (1807) 224 &n.



Sweet Muse of Eyam, thy excursive mind,
By judgment temper'd, and by Taste refin'd,
Might well have scorn'd the Runic path to tread,
Where HICKS oppos'd impenetrable lead;
But, like the SAGE, who, in auspicious hour,
Of transmutation found the wondrous power,
Thy happy genius, luminous and bold,
With magic fire, hath turn'd his lead to gold.
1797.

Mr. Samwell, whose death in 1799 was a loss to the literary world, made the grand Southern Voyages with the illustrious Capt. Cook, and was his chosen friend. He had become, in his later years, a distinguished patron of the compositions of his native country, Wales, in their original tongue, and was himself, occasionally, an elegant poet.