1727 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Jonathan Swift

Anonymous, "To Dr. Swift: by a Gentleman who imitated his Manner and Stile in writing" Collection of Epigrams (1727) No.C.



You who first taught us in this isle
True humour, dress'd in beauteous stile,
Apollo's substitute, most fit
To raise and cultivate our wit.
In this we have our diff'rent view,
You rival him, we copy you;
And copy too with great mistake,
Those noble draughts you often make.
So when the buckler, dropt by fate,
From heav'n, to save the Roman state;
Others were made a common crew,
To guard, but not eclipse the true.
Our whole pretence to pass for wits,
Is that we are your counterfeits.