1797 ca. ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Thomas Sanderson, 1797 ca.; in J. Lowthian, Life and Literary Remains of Thomas Sanderson (1829) lxiv-lxv.



He is a young gentleman ... of considerable talents, as the poems which he has published evince; and what is still more to his credit, bears an excellent private character, and is very religious. No one can have a higher reverence for the inspired writer than he has, which, in this licentious age, certainly does honour to his feelings and good sense. In his opinion, the Song of Deborah is the most sublime piece of poetry extant. Of modern divines he does not conceive any very exalted idea: he thinks they all far short, in learning and abilities, to those of preceding centuries. He speaks of Jeremy Taylor with enthusiastic praise. In the knowledge of human nature, in sentiment and feeling, he compares that divine to Shakspeare.