1828 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Hester Mulso Chapone

Leigh Hunt, in Review of Dyce, Specimens of British Poetesses; The Companion (2 July 1828) 376.



The lady that follows in this interesting and very various procession, is Mrs. Chapone, formerly Miss Mulso, who came out of the coterie of Richardson, and was a very moral person, but not the less sensitive under the rose. She is well known, as Mr. Dyce says, for her Letters on the Improvement of the Mind. We believe they are very good of the sort; but the most interesting thing we remember about them, was their perusal, or rather non-perusal, by two young and very innocent lovers, who, busily occupied (to all appearance) over their pages, and with their cheeks close to one another, took about half an hour in turning over every leaf. Mrs. Chapone's verses are not so good as her book.