1765 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. Charles Churchill

Anonymous, "Verses on reading the Sermons of Mr. Charles Churchill" Royal Magazine 12 (March 1765) 159-60.



When Death, the terror of the brave and fair,
Bade wanton Wilmot for his end prepare,
He sought his God by penitence and pray'r:
To minds infected brought a timely aid,
And suck'd the poison from those wounds he made.
Churchill contriv'd to leave a volume fraught
With antidotes to all his life had taught.
Within the tomb his sad remains abide;
Enquire not how he liv'd, or how he dy'd;
Since earth from him has claim'd, and has her due,
Be all his sins and follies buried too.
These are the works, which now he'd gladly own;
By these now wishes only to be known.
Wilkes, let his lines thy sober hours engage;
Think, thou must die, peruse th' instructive page.
Whence thirst of pleasure, fame, revenge, is fled,
Where ev'ry love, but that of God, is dead.
'Tis Churchill calls, his sermons thou may'st read,
And Churchill thus may prove thy friend indeed.