1814 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Lord Byron

T. C. Holland, "To Lord Byron (Written in 1814)" Monthly Repository of Theology and General Literature 12 (July 1817) 427.



O! I have drunk the rapt'rous cup of joy,
Fill'd with the swelling bliss, that mantled high;
O! I have pour'd affection's bitter tear,
When she, whom most I lov'd, hath press'd the bier.
Yet, from the bitter tear affection shed
Over that breast now number'd with the dead,
E'en from that tear a gentle comfort stole,
Its cordial drops reviv'd my fainting soul,
Not e'en the brimming bowl high swell'd with bliss,
On memory dwells with such delight as this.
O! it was sweet'ned by the rapt'rous thought,
That I should find the bliss she then had sought,
That, purified from ev'ry earthly stain,
Our souls should meet no more to part again.
May equal hopes on all I love attend,
And may we all on heav'n's high will depend,
So death shall not our swelling hearts affright,
But lead us gently to the realms of light;
So God to each the heav'nly bliss shall give,
And ever blest together we shall live.
Say not then "it were better not to be,"
Life's bitt'rest hours are full of bliss to me;
And if beyond the tomb thou, too, hadst seen
Union with all thou lov'dst, they so to thee had been.