1824 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

William Whitehead

Bryan Waller Procter, in Effigies Poeticae, or, the Portraits of the British Poets (1824) 95-96.



From a Picture by Wilson, in the Collection of Earl Marcourt.

This is the head of WILLIAM WHITEHEAD, the poet laureat, and author of the dramas of "The Roman Father" and "Creusa." The Whiteheads (like the Wrongheads) were not a prepossessing family; and, yet this writer had the reputation of having been handsome in his youth. He was an amiable and inoffensive man, and was on that account, we suppose, vilified by Churchill, who was the common slanderer of his time. The fact of Garrick refusing to let one of Whitehead's plays be performed unless he would conceal his name, shows, at once, the paltry time-serving spirit of the actor, and the weakness of the dramatist. In this likeness, Whitehead wears a heavy unintellectual countenance, and looks, indeed, almost like a candidate for Bedlam.