1813 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Samuel Rogers

Francis Hodgson, "The Pleasures of Poetry, by S. R." Leaves of Laurel; or New Probationary Odes, for the Vacant Laureatship (1813) 5-6.



The fading moon-beams part from Pinner-green,
The misty dawn steals mournful o'er the scene;
No human step pervades the dubious gloom,
But nature sorrows o'er the Laureat's tomb.
Pale hung the bay-leaves on their drooping stalk,
And withering ivy strews his favourite walk.
The silent dews their fragrant life exhale,
The wakening woodland feels the chilly gale;
The stirring leaves a fancied requiem breathe,
And the grass sighs for him who sleeps beneath.

Then, in this isle, where patriot bosoms feel
Their own embodied in the public weal,
Can nerveless age, can glowing youth, deny
One tearful tribute to the grave of P—e?
P—e, who each year with new-plum'd praise could sing
The matchless Consort, and the matchless King?