1813 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. George Crabbe

Francis Hodgson, "The Parish Poet, by the Rev. G. C." Leaves of Laurel; or New Probationary Odes, for the Vacant Laureatship (1813) 13.



With tatter'd Gown, and Hair that loosely flies,
Down Pinner Lanes the Muse of Monarchs hies;
The Birth-day Muse has lost her darling Son,
For P—e, James P—e, the Poet Laureat's gone.

The Village Hinds assemble round his Bier,
And Richard Wilkins sheds the tenderest Tear.
Richard himself a Poet had become,
And left for idle Verse his busy Home.
Long, over Land and Sea, he bent his Path;
And now, worn out by Fortune's Wrongs and Wrath,
Home he return'd; and not one human Eye
Or knew the Poet, or his Poetry.
The Sexton late had died; and wayward Chance,
Choosing poor Richard's Fortunes to advance,
Made him the Sexton; and with tearful Eye
He buried thus the tuneful Corse of P—e.