1793 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Sir Philip Sidney

W. D., "Lines written on a blank Leaf in Sir Philip Sydney's Arcadia" New York Magazine and Literary Repository 4 (January 1793) 58.



Accomplish'd, worthy SYDNEY! may thy name
Buoy up this verse and consecrate to fame:—
Oh! could I sing as thy sweet shepherds sung,
Whilst listening ladies on their accents hung:
Then might I dare with lofty lyre to raise
The swelling note befitting SYDNEY'S praise.
Here see the poet with the soldier join'd,
The able statesman and the wit combin'd:
Not less of letters than of men he knew;
Nature he saw and skilfully he drew:
So, as he sung of loving, so he lov'd,
And England's dames to equal passion mov'd;
So, as he sung of fighting, he could fight,
Himself the model of a matchless Knight.
But see, he sink on ZUTPHEN'S bloody plain!
Britannia weeps her bravest Hero slain;
Lov'd Liberty laments th' untimely fall
Of one who fought obedient to her call.
Beauty and Valour, Wit and Worth combin'd,
The fairest body, with the gentlest mind;
Each Virtue shone in SYDNEY'S soaring soul,
And mild Religion crown'd the wond'rous whole.