1800 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Samuel Butler

Thomas Dermody, in "The Pursuit of Patronage" Poems Moral and Descriptive (1800) 53-54.



Quaint Humour's child, whose "colonelling'' knight
Grave Satire archly kens with new delight,
Ingenious BUTLER! through thy various round
Of promissory jilts, what friend was found?
Tho' oft he conn'd thy volume laughter-fraught,
Tickled by each inimitable thought,
(Good easy man, with heedless glee he read,)
Could e'en thy sovereign's purse afford thee bread?
And BUCKINGHAM'S loose conduct well may shew
That wit, to wit is oft its greatest foe.
O! in our later era could I see
One son of smiling Ridicule, like thee,
Still, (keen correction leering in her eyes,)
Profuse of mirth, might sportive Censure rise,
Drop soft elixir where she wounds the heart,
And tickle with the plume that guides her dart!