1800 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Rev. James De La Cour

Thomas Dermody, in "The Pursuit of Patronage" Poems Moral and Descriptive (1800) 60-61.



How many a flow'r has spent its choicest blooms;
Nip'd in it's bud by an untimely blight,
By circling weeds all hid from public sight,
Unknown its fragrance, beautiful in vain,
And torn and trampled by the passing swain,
No lordly son of wealth, no liberal fair,
Pluck'd the lost gem to grace a garland rare,
But spurn'd the simple chaplet nature yields,
Cull'd from the produce of our British fields,
While fam'd exotics, a vile, sickly race,
Find in the warmest beds unbounded space;
There, fade in state, fuliginously grim,
And rot, the martyrs of capricious whim!
Who, tho' on eagle wing alert to soar,
Scans thy sweet lay, disastrous DELACOUR?