1822 ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Charles Lamb

James Harley, in The Press, or Literary Chit-Chat. A Satire (1822) 27-28 &n.



JOCUS.
In every work they write, how odd it is
These Lakish poets seem to woo the quiz!

POCUS.
Such is the case; their imitators too
Always hang out this sign to catch the view.
Thus Lloyd is smitten with the same disease,
Hoping by quaintnesses the world to please.

HOCUS.
He shines most in translation—

POCUS.
Also Lambe,*
Whom Covent Garden once contrived to damn.

HOCUS.
His Farce you mean 'tis better than the mass
Of flitting dramas that before us pass.
His tales are so affected in their style
That oft, in lieu of tears, they cause a smile.

* Lambe is also a pleasing writer, but egregiously affected. His "Mr. H." possesses excellencies as a farce, that induce me to wish its author would devote himself to such a species of writing, instead of mawkish tales, or such vapid and thoroughly ridiculous articles as most of those "Elia" writes in the London Magazine.