1595
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

To the right worthy and noble Knight Sir Walter Raleigh.

Colin Clouts Come Home Againe. By Ed. Spencer.

Edmund Spenser


Edmund Spenser addresses Sir Walter Raleigh, who had assisted him in the publication of his poems. The complete title is "To the right worthy and noble Knight Sir Walter Raleigh, Captain of her Majesties Guard, Lord Wardein of the Stanneries, and Lieutenant of the Countie of Cornwall." Not seen.

Samuel Egerton Brydges: "We are delighted to see reflected the same feelings, the same pleasures from the breasts of our ancestors. We hear the voices of those bearded chiefs, whose portraits adorn the pannels of our halls and galleries, still bearing witness to the same natural and eternal truths; still inveighing against the pomp, the fickleness, and the treachery of courts; and uttering the songs of the shepherd and the woodman, in language that defies the changes of time, and speaks to all ages the touching effusions of the heart" British Bibliographer 3 (1812) xxi.




Sir, that you may see that I am not alwaies ydle as yee thinke, though not greatly well occupied, nor altogither undutifull, though not precisely officious, I make you present of this simple pastorall, unworthie of you higher conceipt for the meanesse of the stile, but agreeing with the truth in circumstance and matter. The which I humbly beseech you to accept in part of paiment of the infinite debt in which I acknowledge my self bounden unto you, for your singular favours and sundrie good turnes shewed to me at my late being in England, and with your good countenance protect against the malice of evill mouthes, which are alwaies wide open to carpe at and misconstrue my simple meaning. I pray continually for your happinesse. From my house of Kilcoman, the 27. of December, 1591.

Yours ever humbly.

Ed. Sp.


[Hopkins Variorum (1932-57) 7:147]