1789
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

To the Right Reverend the Lord Bishop of Down and Connor.

Poems by the Rev. Joseph Sterling.

Rev. Joseph Sterling


A Spenserian sonnet in which Joseph Sterling presents his completion of Cambuscan's tale as a compass-point for the revival of romance and the mission of the Anglican church in Ireland.

Thomas Ogle: "Most of these poems were published in Dublin some years ago; and they are now reprinted in consequence of a criticism which appeared in one of the periodical journals in this country. We own ourselves under obligations to the critic, who has thus introduced to our notice these pleasing productions from a sister nation" Monthly Review NS 3 (November 1790) 272-74.



What Chaucer sung in Woodstock's rural bow'rs,
Was marr'd by death, or Time's unsparing hand;
The Swain of Mulla next essay'd his pow'rs,
And the fair legend of Camballo plann'd.
My bark advent'rous strikes the magic strand;
The blue-ey'd Nereieds on her track attend:
She wafts the prowess'd knights of Eastern land,
Who aid the feeble arm, the fair defend,
The glitt'ring crowns from sanguine tyrants rend.
Like them, be ardent for the public weal,
Nor from the sphere of honour e'er descend,
Thy spirit pious, without bigot zeal;
May thy sun set, as rose thy early dawn;
Thy name as spotless as thy hallow'd lawn!

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