1819
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Fragment.

Edinburgh Magazine and Literary Miscellany NS 4 (January 1819) 68.

C.


Two anonymous Spenserians of an apocalyptic cast: "Moon, star, and cloud — all hurrying silently | Away, as if upon their final march,— | As if the Angel's trump had pealed along that arch." The poem is signed "C.," a regular contributor to the Edinburgh Magazine at this time.



The midnight winds are forth — with high career,
Urging their cloudy chariots rapidly,
As if they rushed to war, or fled in fear,
Along the azure champaign of the sky:
The Heavens are all in motion, and the eye
Beholds the wonted visions of its search,
Moon, star, and cloud — all hurrying silently
Away, as if upon their final march,—
As if the Angel's trump had pealed along that arch.

When thus the hand of mighty seraphim,
This pictured volume from our sight shall roll,
Unfolding to all eyes the face of HIM
Who sits enthroned behind it, — O my soul!
How shalt thou bear to see in funeral stole
Nature distracted, in convulsions lie
On flaming pyre; and, at his destined goal
Time worn and weary, lay him down to die
On the paternal breast of hoar Eternity!

[p. 68]