1820
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

On the Death of a young Bride.

Stanzas to the Queen, with other Verses. By the Rev. Lionel Thomas Berguer.

Rev. Lionel Thomas Berguer


Three Spenserians: "I drew near | Once to thy side, and shunn'd the gentle throng: | Ah! little thoughtful, 'mid that converse dear, | What foes were close at hand: — thy bridal and thy bier!" p. 32. Lionel Thomas Berguer, who published several volumes of poor verse, seems to have attracted little attention from his contemporaries.



And art thou gone, whom late — so late — I knew,
In maiden loveliness and beauty blooming!
And art thou gone, thy bridal wreath so new,
Its primal sweets are still the air perfuming,
While she who wore it, lies beneath, consuming!—
Thy life was like a dream, or vision fair,
With angel form the captive's cell illuming;
Whose beauties melt into the viewless air,
And leave the waking wretch to weep and wonder there!

And thou art gone! — I little thought to sing
Thy funeral dirge, dear spirit: — I, who hung,
As if to heaven's own accents listening—
With a strange mystic pleasure on thy tongue;
Aye fancying in its tones the syren song
My sick hopes faintly dreamed of! — I drew near
Once to thy side, and shunn'd the gentle throng:
Ah! little thoughtful, 'mid that converse dear,
What foes were close at hand: — thy bridal and thy bier!

Thy breast was a pure haven for the loves,
And virtues, sojourning on earth awhile
Blending at once the gentleness of doves,
And wisdom of the snake, without its guile;—
Truth on thy lip, and friendship in thy smile.
Sure, thou wert dear to many: yet sincerer
No heart, than mine, clung to thee — woe the while:
And oft, I wished that I had known thee nearer,
Yet now, I wish it not — for then, thou hadst been dearer.

[pp. 31-32]