1758
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

To Peace.

Gentleman's Magazine 28 (July 1758) 329.

Anonymous


Seven octosyllabic quatrains, after Il Penseroso, not signed: "O lovely gentle peace of mind | Be thou on earth my constant guest, | With thee, whate'er on earth I find, | The pledge of heav'n shall make me blest." Three stanzas describe the landscapes where peace may be found, and three the moral benefits peace bestows.



Come lovely gentle peace of mind
With all thy smiling nymphs around,
Content and innocence combin'd,
With wreath of sacred olive crown'd.

Come thou, that lov'st to walk at eve,
The banks of murm'ring streams along,
That lov'st the crowded court to leave,
And hear the milk maid's simple song.

That lov'st with contemplation's eye
The head-long cataract to view,
That foams and thunders from on high,
While echoes to the sound renew.

That lov'st the dark sequester'd wood,
Where silence spreads her brooding wings,
Nor less the lake's translucent flood,
The mossy grotts and bubbling springs.

With thee, the lamp of wisdom burns,
The guiding light to realms above!
With thee, the raptur'd mortal learns
The wonders of celestial love.

With thee, the poor have endless wealth,
And sacred freedom glads the slave,
With thee! the sick rejoice in health,
The weak are strong the fearful brave.

O lovely gentle peace of mind
Be thou on earth my constant guest,
With thee, whate'er on earth I find,
The pledge of heav'n shall make me blest.

[p. 329]