1796
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Lines written on a young Lady's Recovery from a dangerous Sickness.

Walker's Hibernian Magazine (September 1796) 277-78.

Anne Maria W.


An allegorical ode in the measure of Milton's L'Allegro, signed "Anne Maria W—, April, 1796." The poem is addressed to Health and two sister graces: "Be these the partners of my Hetty's Heart, | And let them never from her breast depart; | With wealth, with grandeur, she may well dispense, | If blest with Health, Content, and Innocence."



Hail blooming Goddess! fair and free,
Blithe Health I tune my lyre to thee;
Delighted in my Hetty's face,
Once more thy rosy charms to trace;
My Hetty! lovely gentle maid!
In Nature's softest charms array'd;
Oh! may'st thou long her cheeks adorn,
With blushes, such as deck the morn;
Oh! ne'er that lov'd abode forsake,
But in each glowing feature speak;
And as she joins the sprightly throng,
Or leads the mazy dance along,
With strictest care do thou attend,
And guard her like a faithful friend;
Then, let no dire disease be near,
In her soft breast to raise a fear;
But with thee bring that lovely pair,
(Strangers to Guilt, unknown to Care,)
Daughters of Peace, (they boast no high descent,)
The elder far, is, lovely mild Content;
That sweet Content [2 lines lost to cropping]
That lovely nymph, whose heart unknown to guile,
Ne'er thinks deceit can dwell beneath a smile;
Who artless, gay, and innocently free,
Unknown to guile, suspects no treachery,
Be these the partners of my Hetty's Heart,
And let them never from her breast depart;
With wealth, with grandeur, she may well dispense,
If blest with Health, Content, and Innocence.

[pp. 277-78]