1804
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

On Melancholy.

Scots Magazine 66 (March 1804) 219.

W. H-e


A condensation of Milton's Il Penseroso in which the nymph Melancholy, given the usual attributes, is observed wandering the fields by night: "Thro' forests drear, or woods forlorn, | Till the peep of roseate morn." The poem is signed "W. H—e."



In a valley green and wide,
Near a rugged mountain's side;
Far from riot, noise, and folly,
Lives the nymph of Melancholy.
When Eve, with all her sable train,
Assumes her empire o'er the plain,
'Tis then she leaves her moss-grown cell,
With the gloomy night to dwell.
In her dusk-brown mantle clad,
See her walk sedate and sad,
With folded arms, and tearful eyes,
And breast upheav'd with frequent sighs;
O'er verdant lawns with dew bespread,
O'er dreary mansions of the dead;
Or by the morn's faint glimm'ring beams,
Reflecting clear on silv'ry streams.
Thro' forests drear, or woods forlorn,
Till the peep of roseate morn;
Then thro' walks of blushing holly,
Glides the nymph of Melancholy.

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