1766
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Kynge Bladyde to W— P— sendethe Greeting.

Bath Chronicle (22 May 1766).

Dr. Henry Harington


Complimentary verses addressed in the black letter to William Pitt: "May humble Crutche bedecke poore Bladud's Shryne: | Britannia's Hearte be offerede uppe at Thyne." King Bladud was the legendary founder of Bath. This curious epigram, not signed, was afterwards collected in Water Poetry. A Collection of Verses written at several Public Places (1771), an anthology of poems written at the various spas.

The author of this poem is possibly Dr. Henry Harington, who may also be responsible for another such poem, "Verses written in the Pump-Room at Bath," published in the Bath Chronicle (17 June 1773). "Kynge Bladyde" was reprinted in the London Magazine under that headnote, "The following Lines have been handed about at Bath."

Headnote in Gentleman's Magazine: "Bath July 18, 1767. The inclosed compliment to Mr. P—t was much admired when handed about here, and may be very agreeable to many of those who were not at Bath when it was written last summer before Mr. P—t's peerage. It was printed in black letter to give it an air of antiquity, and the public papers have made it the cause of much mirth" 37 (July 1767) 378.



Much wond'rous Goode dothe Baia's Founte dispense.
More wond'rous farre dothe flowe Thyne Eloquence.
My Springes may aide some palsied Lymbe to free:
Thy myghtier Cure — must not comparede be:
Britannia's Self restor'd — to Libertie.

Ye kyndrede Streams, O! keepe your wontede Course:
Let Ages prove your uncorrupted Source.
May humble Crutche bedecke poore Bladud's Shryne:
Britannia's Hearte be offerede uppe at Thyne.

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