1781
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

A Pastoral Ballad.

The Poetical Works of George Keate, Esq.

George Keate


Five anapestic quatrains. Reversing the situation in Shenstone's Pastoral Ballad, George Keate has Phillis abandoned by Colin: "All cold, and stretch'd out in the shade | By the Virgins, pale Phillis was found; | And a scroll on her bosom was laid, | Declaring, that Love gave the wound.—"

Edmund Cartwright: "The principal poems in this collection have been already printed, and are too well known to be here enumerated. The pieces that are added bear the same marks of a cultivated taste and an amiable mind that uniformly distinguish the productions of this Writer's pen" Monthly Review 65 (September 1781) 235.



How wretched the Maiden who loves
A Shepherd unworthy her care!
From Fair-one, to Fair-one who roves,
And whose Promise is lighter than Air!

Such the Sorrows which poor PHILLIS knew,
Who COLIN too rashly believ'd;
His aim was to triumph o'er you,
Ah! PHILLIS, unkindly deceiv'd!—

Beneath the dark Cypress she lay,
And sigh'd her Complaint to the Wind
"That her COLIN had wander'd away,
And left her despairing behind."

All cold, and stretch'd out in the shade
By the Virgins, pale PHILLIS was found;
And a scroll on her bosom was laid,
Declaring, that Love gave the wound.—

The Shepherds still speak of her Truth
As they point out her Grave with a sigh,
And upbraid thy inconstancy, Youth!
Who could suffer such Beauty to die.

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