1800
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Canzonet.

The Meteor No. 11 (1800) 2:187-90.

E. C.


Five double-quatrain stanzas, after William Shenstone's Pastoral Ballad. The Canzonet, signed "E. C., Lynn," consists of Thyrsis's love-complaint for Amoret, whom he suspects scorns his poverty: "Yet what though no corn-fields have I, | No flocks o'er the mountains that rove; | She will not, she cannot deny | Poor Thyrsis is ample in love!"

The Meteor was a periodical devoted exclusively to poetry, which is to say a poetry anthology published periodically. It survived for two volumes, published 1799-1800; E. C. was supplying a goodly portion of the verse towards the end.



Sweet pipe! thou choice boon of my fair,
Ere yet she had learnt to betray,
O, breathe some mellifluent air,
To chase the long minutes away.
But in vain I my woes would forget,
Whilst my charmer strays far from my eyes!
False echoes! why mock my regret?
Ye zephyrs! why slight thus my sighs?

Ah! rather my passion to speak,
A kiss to my Amoret bear!
O would ye but drop on her cheek
One pledge of my anguish — a tear!
Go ask, gentle messengers! why
These arms the ingrate hath forsook?
Alas, I fortel her reply—
"Poor Thyrsis has nought but his crook."

Yet what though no corn-fields have I,
No flocks o'er the mountains that rove;
She will not, she cannot deny
Poor Thyrsis is ample in love!
Though sweet to the traveller's ear
The soft lulling murmur of rills;
Though wild thyme to Hybla be dear,
To goats the steep Appenine hills;

Though the arbute be sweet to the bees,
To shepherds the wide-spreading tree,
Yet sweeter, far sweeter than these,
Are the smiles of my Charmer to me!
Cease, my pipe! cease thy warbling — for hark!
Some footsteps approach my retreat—
Why, Hylax, that gratulant bark?
Why gambol so blithe at my feet?

Why, lambkins! forbear ye to feed,
Your heads all erect at the sound?
Some swain haply trips through the mead,
In search of a kid newly drown'd.
Ah, no! — behold yonder my fair!
To sorrow I now bid adieu—
Thy zephyrs have heard my fond prayer,
And Amoret's bosom is true!

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