1786
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Pastoral Ballad.

Morning Chronicle and London Advertiser (29 July 1786).

Anonymous


Five anapestic quatrains, not signed. This variation on the pastoral ballad series features a changing refrain. Poems in this measure seem always to have been warmly received by William Woodfall's Morning Chronicle.

Headnote: "At this season of gaiety and smiles, I should feel myself wanting in duty to withold my mite: I therefore, without further apology, present you with a poetical trifle to open the way for other matters of greater magnitude, which come under the same latter. There seems an innocent tenderness in the following verses, which I think will be felt by the pure minded, who prefer the mildness of the rural muse, to the more catching sallies of the tutored minstrel."



Ye shepherds who cheerfully pipe through the day,
Attend to a lover's enraptured lay;
His song is of beauty, you love the dear theme,
For ELIZA and beauty are ever the same.

Give joy to the village where beauty resides,
Where sweet sensibility sweetly presides,
Where virtue triumphant enjoys a soft reign,
For ELIZA and virtue are ever the same.

I know your good hearts will accord in the praise
Of all the bright precepts which virtue conveys;
Rejoice, where with virtue true wisdom I name,
For ELIZA and wisdom are ever the same.

The Graces adorn and embellish the fair,
To you, my dear shepherds, the Graces are dear;
Then haste and do homage to her I proclaim,
For ELIZA and gracefulness still are the same.

O! should the dear maiden, inspir'd from above,
But smile on fond DAMON, who dies for her love;
Dear shepherds! how joyfully should I exclaim,
ELIZA and happiness now are the same!

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