1783
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Stanzas on the late Marriage of Miss Fell, of Essex.

Morning Herald and Daily Advertiser (24 July 1783).

B. X.


Three double-quatrain stanzas, signed "B. X." The poem extends the Pastoral Ballad mode to epithalamium, with the usual emphasis on taste: "She comes in her bridal array, | 'Tis elegant, simple and neat, | How the looks of each swain seem to say, | Dear Maid, I could die at your feet!"



Ye shepherds and nymphs of the plain,
To whom the glad moments belong;
Come cheerfully join in the strain,
And echo with pleasure my song;
The tabor and pipe's sprightly sound,
Shall gladness dispense through the grove,
The day shall with rapture be crown'd,
'Tis sacred to Laura and love.

For Laura, the pride of the dale,
Young Corydon claims as his bride;
With pleasure I dwell on the tale,
And see, where she comes by his side.
She comes in her bridal array,
'Tis elegant, simple and neat,
How the looks of each swain seem to say,
Dear Maid, I could die at your feet!

But haste! the soft flutes breathe around,
Whilst onward the virgins all move,
Who strew with fresh flowrets the ground,
To grace the procession of love;
To still as she journies through life,
May flowrets be strew'd in her way;
And no thorn, luckless emblem of strife,
One painful sensation convey!

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