1782
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

To Miss F. T—ll, of Streatham, Surrey.

Morning Herald and Daily Advertiser (4 March 1782).

Mrs. Wrighten


Five anapestic quatrains, part of the busy series of poems developed out of William Shenstone's Pastoral Ballad. This lyric touches on two of the more prominent themes in this series, taste and country life: "What transports, what permanent pleasures await, | The youth who shall call her his own! | He may view from a cot without envy, the state | Of the happiest Prince on a throne!" The poem is not signed.



When FANNY first chaunts in the ecchoing grove,
The virgins all hasten around,
The swains leave their flocks in the vallies to rove,
And with rapture attend to the sound!

Late I heard her an air with such accents repeat,
As we walk'd the green meadows along;
That the notes through my breast thrill'd enchantingly sweet
My heart beating time to her song!

Nor less in the Nymph the endowments we trace,
Of sense, and of manners refin'd;
The Loves and the Graces, all sport in her face,
And the virtues are lodg'd in her mind!

What transports, what permanent pleasures await,
The youth who shall call her his own!
He may view from a cot without envy, the state
Of the happiest Prince on a throne!

For me, in each village how great were my fame!
How much would the Shepherd rejoice!
Could the verse, that recites her just praises, but claim,
To be sung by her ravishing voice!

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