1776
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

The Happy Shepherd.

The Shrubs of Parnassus, or, Juvenile Muse. A Collection of Songs, and Poems. Chiefly Pastoral. By W. Hawkins.

William Hawkins


Three quatrain stanzas. Damon offers his advice to the fair sex: "Brother shepherds that toil on the plain, | By me take example, I pray, | Throw off all your sorrow and pain, | And ever be chearful and gay" p. 5. William Hawkins, who wrote much in the anapestic measure, seems to have been influencial in adapting the pastoral ballad mode to popular song.



How happy a Shepherd am I,
With LAURA, the pride of my heart;
I'll never once languish or sigh,
For know, she has caus'd all my smart.
She vows that she will be my wife
By all that is honest and fair,
Then I'll be her husband for life,
And never know sorrow or care.

Brother shepherds that toil on the plain,
By me take example, I pray,
Throw off all your sorrow and pain,
And ever be chearful and gay.
Then nymphs that are modest and shy,
For once hear young DAMON'S advice;
The reason I tell you, for why,
As happy you'll be in a trice.

Give each of your hands to your swain,
Then drive away faction and strife;
Bid adieu to all anguish and pain!
And be happy th' rest of your life.
Such is DAMON'S advice, my kind fair;
Then take it most freely, I pray;
So fly from all sorrow and care,
Henceforward be merry and gay.

[p. 5]